Skip to end of metadata
Go to start of metadata

  Webinar with Certificate | Recorded Webinar |  Additional Resources | Others from this presenter | Related Questions

 

Thumbnail

 

Thumbnail Page Comment

Rick Marshall

Rick is the founder and executive director of the VISTA Expertise Network. He is a tier-five, master-hardhat VISTA developer who has implemented, programmed,

 

Webinar Overview
VISTA is complex. We overlook its complexity at our peril. To plan VISTA's architecture properly, we must first fully appreciate what it means for it to be that complex, especially in terms of our own reactions to that complexity - because it is those very reactions that usually defeat us. If we could appreciate its full complexity and our reactions to it, we would greatly improve our chances of coming up with a viable architecture. The problems inherent in multi-site, multi-division enterprises are no exception.
A good paradigm for studying complexity and our response to it is the game of chess, which seems odd because chess is so vastly simpler than VISTA by over a dozen orders of magnitude. Yet that is its virtue for our purposes. It is only thirty pieces that can move on sixty-four squares according to limited rules, and the pieces themselves are arranged into six kinds and two sides. These are small numbers. How hard could it be? What could possibly go wrong?

The license could not be verified: License Certificate has expired!

The license could not be verified: License Certificate has expired!

Part 1: Complexity & Complication
 Part 1: Complexity & Complication
 

VISTA is complex. We overlook its complexity at our peril. To plan VISTA's architecture properly, we must first fully appreciate what it means for it to be that complex, especially in terms of our own reactions to that complexity - because it is those very reactions that usually defeat us. If we could appreciate its full complexity and our reactions to it, we would greatly improve our chances of coming up with a viable architecture. The problems inherent in multi-site, multi-division enterprises are no exception.
A good paradigm for studying complexity and our response to it is the game of chess, which seems odd because chess is so vastly simpler than VISTA by over a dozen orders of magnitude. Yet that is its virtue for our purposes. It is only thirty pieces that can move on sixty-four squares according to limited rules, and the pieces themselves are arranged into six kinds and two sides. These are small numbers. How hard could it be? What could possibly go wrong?

 

 

Part 2 · The Hidden Nature of Order
 Part 2 · The Hidden Nature of Order 

Enterprises self-conflict. The needs of each individual hospital conflict with the needs of the multi-hospital enterprises they are a part of. They have different needs, and they compete for resources and priorities. This is the level at which the complexity of multi-site, multi-division VISTA has to be managed - not at the level of packages, technology, or other details. If we could learn to see the forces and their conflicts, we would be able to understand what a viable architecture needs to accomplish.
Conflict-management theory has a lot to teach us about this. Identifying the competing needs and the nature of their conflicts is crucial. But so is changing our thinking about conflict. If we think in terms of victory and defeat, then our solutions cannot do justice to the full complexity of the problem we're trying to solve. If we think in terms of compromise, the same is true. So what else is there? How can we resolve these inescapable contradictions within VISTA enterprises?

 

 

 

Part 3. Conflict & Forces

Part 3. Conflict & Forces

Vitality requires conflict. Instead of eliminating conflicting forces, sustainable solutions require us to design those forces and conflicts into our solutions - since what's in conflict are necessary but competing needs. If we could design our systems to meet all of those needs rather than suppressing some or all of them, our designs would be viable, sustainable. This is how we have to think about the design of a multi-site, multi-division VISTA architecture.

How can we possibly resolve the conflicts inherent in such an enterprise? By following the only paradigm that builds conflict into solutions in a way that harnesses it - life itself. In the realm of biology, all living organisms bend internal conflicts back upon themselves to create oscillating systems that strengthen the organism rather than tearing it apart. VISTA's most successful architectural elements and software-lifecycle features follow the model of living systems. How does this model work? How can we apply it to the design of multi-site, multi-division VISTA systems?


 

 

The license could not be verified: License Certificate has expired!

The license could not be verified: License Certificate has expired!

Part 3. Conflict & Forces

Use this option if you need a Certificate of Completion

Please sign in to access the course

 

Additional resources


Presenter Webinars Participation

Recent Questions

Topics:

  1. 0
    votes
  2. 0
    votes
  3. 0
    votes
  4. 0
    votes
  5. 0
    votes
  6. 0
    votes
  7. 0
    votes
  8. 0
    votes
  9. 0
    votes
  10. 0
    votes
  11. 0
    votes
  12. 0
    votes
  13. 0
    votes
    status
  14. 0
    votes
  15. 0
    votes
  16. 0
    votes
  17. 0
    votes
  18. 0
    votes
  19. 0
    votes
  20. 0
    votes
  21. 0
    votes
  22. 0
    votes
  23. 1
    vote
  24. 0
    votes
    status

 

 

2 Comments

  1. If you have any questions, comments, or criticisms, please don't hesitate to ask. I love a good discussion, and this material is far too complex (hah - get it? complex? never mind) for me to have done justice to it in just one hour.

  2. So now, as of the end of part three, we're coming to the tangible application of these ideas, to begin the process of teasing apart the problem in terms of the framework described in the first three parts, by:

    a) seeking out the dimensions, conflicts, and fundamental forces at work in the software,

    b) prioritizing our goals (an end to naive wish lists) to determine what we're willing and not willing to sacrifice, and

    c) learning how to reconfigure conflicting forces into organic structures that can create coherent architecture out of those conflicts, by doing the same thing the cosmos does - create new meta-properties and meta-order out of the proper resolution of more fundamental conflicts.

    That's where we'll pick this up next Thursday.

    If you have any questions, please don't hesitate to ask. This stuff is the secret to my success with VISTA, and I'm passing it on for free here, so take advantage of it while you can.